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RX FOR NON-HEALING ULCERS




Successful treatment of difficult wounds requires assessment of the entire patient and not just the wound. Systemic problems often impair wound healing; conversely, nonhealing wounds may herald systemic pathology.

Consider the negative effects of endocrine diseases (eg, diabetes, hypothyroidism), hematologic conditions (eg, anemia, polycythemia, myeloproliferative disorders), cardiopulmonary problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure), GI problems that cause malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies, obesity, and peripheral vascular pathology (eg, atherosclerotic disease, chronic venous insufficiency, lymphedema).

Characterize the wound

Assess the following: (1) size and depth of involvement and the extent of undermining, (2) the appearance of the wound surface—is it necrotic or viable, (3) amount and characteristic(s) of wound exudate, and (4) status of the periwound tissues (eg, pigmented, scarred, atrophic, cellulitic).

Ensure adequate oxygenation

The usual reason for inadequate tissue oxygenation is local vasoconstriction as a result of sympathetic overactivity. This may occur because of blood volume deficit, unrelieved pain, or hypothermia, especially involving the distal extent of the extremities.

Ensure adequate nutrition

Adequate nutrition is an often-overlooked requirement for normal wound healing. Address protein-calorie malnutrition and deficiencies of vitamins and minerals.

Inadequate protein-calorie nutrition, even after just a few days of starvation, can impair normal wound-healing mechanisms. For healthy adults, daily nutritional requirements are approximately 1.25-1.5 g of protein per kilogram of body weight and 25-30 calories/kg. These requirements can increase, however, for patients with sizeable wounds.

Suspect malnutrition in patients with chronic illnesses, inadequate societal support, multisystemic trauma, or GI or neurologic problems that may impair oral intake. Protein deficiency occurs in approximately 25% of all hospitalized patients. Oftentimes, a thorough physical examination can reveal signs of malnutrition, such as temporal wasting, loss of subcutaneous fat, ankle/sacral edema, pronounced clavicles.

Chronic malnutrition can be diagnosed using anthropometric data to compare actual and ideal body weights and by observing low serum albumin levels. Serum prealbumin is sensitive for relatively acute malnutrition because its half-life is 2-3 days (vs 21 d for albumin). A serum prealbumin level of less than 16-17 g/dL suggests some level of malnutrition, whereas a level less than 10 g/dL suggests severe protein-calorie malnutrition.

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies also require correction. Vitamin A deficiency reduces fibronectin on the wound surface, reducing cell chemotaxis, adhesion, and tissue repair. Vitamin C is required for the hydroxylation of proline and subsequent collagen synthesis.

Vitamin E, a fat-soluble antioxidant, accumulates in cell membranes, where it protects polyunsaturated fatty acids from oxidation by free radicals, stabilizes lysosomes, and inhibits collagen synthesis. Vitamin E inhibits prostaglandin synthesis by interfering with phospholipase-A2 activity and is therefore anti-inflammatory. Vitamin E supplementation may decrease scar formation.

Zinc is a component of approximately 200 enzymes in the human body, including DNA polymerase, which is required for cell proliferation, and superoxide dismutase, which scavenges superoxide radicals produced by leukocytes during debridement.